Cytomel T3 (Liothyronine)

What is Cytomel T3?

Cytomel is a brand and trade name for T3, which is Liothyronine Sodium. Liothyronine Sodium is a synthetic variant of the human body’s own thyroid hormone. It should be understood that the human body’s own natural endogenously manufactured thyroid hormone is actually known as Triiodothyronine, which is different from Liothyronine Sodium. Liothyronine is the L-isomer of Triiodothyronine. Liothyronine and Triiodothyronine are both nearly identical with one another, but Liothyronine is a more potent variant and is also better absorbed orally, which is why it has been developed into a prescription medicine and preparation known as Cytomel, Tiromel, Tertroxin, etc. Within a medical and clinical setting, Cytomel (T3) is utilized in the treatment of hypothyroidism, which is a condition whereby an individual’s thyroid gland is not secreting the proper and normal levels of thyroid hormone for proper function. In such a case, hypothyroidism is commonly diagnosed via a blood test that analyzes the serum hormone profile of thyroid hormones (T3, T4, and TSH, which is Thyroid Stimulating Hormone). Hypothyroidism also carries with it various symptoms such as a lack of energy, lethargy, weight and fat gain, hair loss, and alterations in skin colour and texture. T3 is the primary thyroid hormone used by the body.
Liothyronine is a man-made form of a hormone that is normally produced by your thyroid gland to regulate the body’s energy and metabolism. Liothyronine is given when the thyroid does not produce enough of this hormone on its own.
Liothyronine treats hypothyroidism (low thyroid hormone). Liothyronine is also given as part of a medical test for thyroid disorders.
Liothyronine is also used together with surgery and radioactive iodine therapy in people with thyroid cancer.
Liothyronine should not be used to treat obesity or weight problems.
Liothyronine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.
T3 was originally formulated as a medicine by way of an extract from the thyroid gland. Many hormonal medicines originated in the same way, as being derived from the endocrine glands from the cadavers of animals and humans. The very first application of this thyroid extract was administered in 1981 to an individual who suffered from myxedema, which is a skin disorder that is normally the result of hypothyroidism. Thyroid hormones were some of the very first hormonal medicines used in the field of endocrinology and in the treatment of many disorders and diseases. The very first thyroid extracts not only contained T3, but also T4, and these extracts were utilized for over 60 years in medicine. In the 1950s, methods of creating thyroid hormones synthetically took over and the previously used thyroid extracts were done away with. Liothyronine Sodium (T3) and Levothyroxine Sodium (T4) are the two most popular currently used synthetic thyroid hormones, and are widely available both in the United States as well as internationally. Cytomel tends to be the most widely utilized and most recognized brand name of T3, especially in the United States. In The USA, Cytomel is manufactured by King Pharmaceuticals.
T3, much like many other ancillary bodybuilding drugs is widely available with very little or no laws in regards to its sale, distribution, purchase, or use in most countries throughout the world. It is manufactured by dozens of different pharmaceutical companies across the world with different brand and trade names, as well as a diverse selection of generic T3 products. Because of the vast availability and manufacture of this product, it is not uncommon to find a wide variation in different T3 dosages in the different products. For example, T3 can commonly be seen in concentrations ranging from 5mcg, 25mcg, and all the way up to 50mcg tablets.

What is the most important information I should know about Cytomel (Liothyronine)?

Since thyroid hormone occurs naturally in the body, almost anyone can take liothyronine. However, you may not be able to use this medicine if you have an adrenal gland problem that is not controlled by treatment.
Tell your doctor if you have ever had:
problems with your pituitary or adrenal gland;
heart disease, angina (chest pain);
a bleeding or blood clotting disorder;
diabetes; or
osteoporosis or low bone mineral density.
Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.
Follow your doctor’s instructions about using this medicine if you are pregnant. Controlling your thyroid hormone levels is very important during pregnancy, and your dose needs may be different during each trimester.

What are the side effects of Cytomel (Liothyronine)?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.
Stop using liothyronine and call your doctor if you have symptoms of thyroid toxicity, such as chest pain, fast or pounding heartbeats, feeling hot or nervous, or sweating more than usual.
Also call your doctor at once if you have:
1.weak or shallow breathing;
2.confusion;
3.a feeling of being cold all the time;
4.changes in weight or appetite;
5.chest pressure spreading to your jaw or shoulder;
6.a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;
7.severe headaches, ringing in your ears, dizziness, vision problems, pain behind your eyes;
8.a seizure; or (in a child or teenager) pain, stiffness, and trouble moving the legs.

Common side effects may include:

trouble breathing;
headache;
tremors, feeling nervous or irritable;
muscle weakness;
increased appetite;
diarrhea;
irregular menstrual periods;
weight loss;
feeling hot;
rash; or sleep problems (insomnia).

How to take Cytomel (Liothyronine)?

Use Cytomel (Liothyronine) exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.
Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Use the medicine exactly as directed.
Older adults may be more sensitive to the effects of liothyronine, and doses are generally lower for people in this age group.
If you are switching to liothyronine from any other thyroid medicine, stop using the other medicine before you start taking liothyronine.
Liothyronine doses are based on weight (especially in children and teenagers). Your dose needs may change if you gain or lose weight.
When given as part of a thyroid suppression test, you will need to take this medicine for several days in a row in preparation for the test. Tell your doctor if you miss any doses during this time.
Your thyroid function will need to be tested often. Even if you have no symptoms, tests can help your doctor determine if this medicine is effective.
If you need surgery, tell your surgeon you currently use this medicine. You may need to stop for a short time.
This medicine can affect the results of certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using liothyronine.
Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. You may need to take thyroid medication for the rest of your life.
Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if overdose on Cytomel (Liothyronine)?

Overdose symptoms may include headache, sweating, diarrhea, irregular menstrual periods, confusion, weakness, swelling in your hands or feet, fast heart rate, chest pain, feeling short of breath, fainting, or feeling nervous, restless, or irritable.

Summary

The bodybuilding and athletic world is attracted to the use of T3 as a physique and/or performance enhancing drug because of its capability to distinctly boost the body’s metabolism in the effort to metabolize body fat at a greater rate. T3 is traditionally utilize during cutting, dieting, and/or pre-contest phases of training due to the universal goal of these phases to break down body fat, though in recent years Cytomel has gained some popularity as a useful agent during bulking and mass gaining phases of training (normally in conjunction with anabolic steroids) in order to better efficiently process nutrients and/or to keep body fat levels down during periods of higher caloric intake. Cytomel (T3) is commonly used with anabolic steroids due to its significant impact on the body’s metabolism as a whole. It is very important to understand that T3 is indiscriminate in its metabolism boosting properties – it will increase the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and protein all equally. Therefore, beyond a particular dose of T3, there is an increased risk of muscle loss through increased turnover of protein. Through the use of anabolic steroids and a properly adjusted diet, this muscle loss as a result of T3 can be prevented as a result of the nitrogen-retaining and protein sparing properties of theanabolic steroids.